Fall Fun on Indiana Farms: We’re Having Pork from a Real Pig?

This past weekend my family had the chance to venture south of the city and learn more about two Indiana farms up close. My city kids got to climb on tractors, learn about how crops are grown, pet a cow, and so much more.

Indiana Family of Farmers hosted a group of Indianapolis bloggers to show us what happens on farms across Indiana every single day, all over the state. 98% of Indiana farms are family owned, and it was fascinating to learn about two of them.

Both the Campbell Farm ( we got to see the actual Front Porch of Jen’s Front Porch) and Kelsay Farms¬†are being run by sixth generation farmers. These farmers are not only farming the land, they’re raising what will be the seventh generation on their land. This blew my mind, because I’m a third generation American. That’s it. When my great grandfather was in line at Ellis Island, the Campbells and the Kelsays were exactly where they are today.

I loved letting the kids run around an explore the hay rolls, visit with the pigs and ride mini-pedal tractors. When I commented that I was excited to have pork for dinner as the delicious smell wafted through the air, my daughter said, “We’re having pork from a real pig?” Yes, it is good for my kids to run around and breathe the country air.

FallFunontheFarm

I also learned about how the Kelsays feed their dairy herd. LIz and Leah talked the kids through an activity that detailed what makes up feed for the cattle. Did you know that it’s not just corn? It’s actually a variety of things, including molasses, because cows like sweet things just like we do. Did you know that they have to mash up and mix up the feed because cows pick through their food, just like we do? Did you know that samples have to be taken so that the right balance of nutrients is in the feed? I HAD NO IDEA.

Thank you for a great night, Indiana Family of Farmers. Living in Indiana I drive by farms nearly every day, but rarely do I ever stop and look at them, never mind learn what happens in the fields or the barns.